Chinese Buddhism

A Comparative and Critical Study of the Mahaprajapati – Sutra

Author: 
Yuande Shih, Ven.

Yuande ShihThis sutra draws out each progress of a woman’s Buddhist career and leads the women to attain the highest Awakening. This sutra transcends the gender distinction to realize the gender equality which prescribes the 84 feminie weaknesses hindering the women’s spiritual attainment, and later it compiled in response to the women’s determination towards the liberation in the early 5th century of China.

The Power of Patriarchs

Author: 
Morrison, Elizabeth

A study of the Northern Song Chan monk Qisong and his writings on Chan lineage, this book offers new arguments about Buddhist patriarchs, challenges assumptions about Chan masters, and provides insight into the interactions of Buddhists and the imperial chan.

Violence and Serenity

Author: 
Natasha Reichle

The mention of Buddhism in Indonesia calls to mind for many people the Central Javanese monument of Borobudur, one of the largest Buddhist monuments in the world and the subject of extensive scholarly scrutiny. The neglect of scholarship on Buddhist art from later periods might lead one to assume that after the tenth century Buddhism had been completely eclipsed by the predominantly Hindu Eastern Javanese dynasties. Yet, as the works discussed here illustrate, extraordinary Buddhist images were still being produced as late as the fourteenth century.

Skilful Means

Author: 
MICHAEL PYE

'Skilful Means' is the key principle of Mahayana, one of the great Buddhist traditions. First described in the Lotus Sutra, it originates in myths of the Buddha's compassionate plans for raising life from the ceaseless round of birth and death. His strategies or interventions are 'skilful means' - morally wholesome tricks devised for the purpose of enabling nirvana or enlightenment.

Cultural Intersections in Later Chinese Buddhism

Author: 
Marsha Smith Weidner (Editor)

This collection of essays on "later" Chinese Buddhism takes us beyond the bedrock subjects of traditional Buddhist historiography - scriptures and commentaries, sectarian developments, lives of notable monks - to examine a wide range of extracanonical materials that illuminate cultural manifestations of Buddhism from the Song dynasty (960-1279) through the modern period.

Introducing Buddha

Author: 
Jane Hope, Borin Van Loon

THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER

"Introducing Buddha" describes the life and teachings of the Buddha, but it also shows that enlightenment is a matter of experiencing the truth individually and by inspiration which is passed from teacher to student. Superbly illustrated by Borin Van Loon, the book illuminates this process through a rich legacy of stories and explains the practices of meditation, Taoism and Zen. It goes on to describe the role of Buddhism in modern Asia and its growing influence on Western thought

Mysticism : Christian and Buddhist

Author: 
Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki

If the Western world knows anything about Zen Buddhism, it is down to the efforts of one remarkable man, D.T. Suzuki. The twenty-seven year-old Japanese scholar first visited the West in 1897, and over the course of the next seventy years became the world's leading authority on Zen. His radical and penetrating insights earned him many disciples, from Carl Jung to Allen Ginsberg, from Thomas Merton to John Cage. In Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist Suzuki compares the teachings of the great Christian mystic Meister Eckhart with the spiritual wisdom of Shin and Zen Buddhism.

Basic Buddhist Psychology

Author: 
Rahu Sarath Chandra

Chapter 1 The Primary Role of the Senses
Chapter 2 Consciousness as the Core of the Mind
Chapter 3 The Seven Common Mental Formations
Chapter 4 The Six Optional Common Mental Formations
Chapter 5 The Fourteen Unwholesome Mental States
Chapter 6 The Twenty Five Wholesome Mental States
Chapter 7 The Analysis of a Thought and the Thinking Process
Chapter 8 The Significance of Perceptions
Chapter 9 The Methods of Managing Perceptions
Chapter 10 Memory and Related Processes

Kuan-yin

Author: 
Chun-fang Yu

By far one of the most important objects of worship in the Buddhist traditions, the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara is regarded as the embodiment of compassion. He has been widely revered throughout the Buddhist countries of Asia since the early centuries of the Common Era. While he was closely identified with the royalty in South and Southeast Asia, and the Tibetans continue to this day to view the Dalai Lamas as his incarnations, in China he became a she -- Kuan-yin, the "Goddess of Mercy" -- and has a very different history. The causes and processes of this metamorphosis have perplexed Buddhist scholars for centuries.

The Shaolin Monastery

Author: 
Meir Shahar
The Shaolin Monastery charts, for the first time in any language, the history of the Shaolin Temple and the evolution of its world-renowned martial arts. In this meticulously researched and eminently readable study, Meir Shahar considers the economic, political, and religious factors that led Shaolin monks to disregard the Buddhist prohibition against violence and instead create fighting techniques that by the twenty-first century have spread throughout the world.

The Power of Patriarchs

Author: 
Elizabeth Morrison

The Chan monk Qisong (1007-1072), an important figure in Northern Song religious and intellectual history, has garnered relatively little scholarly attention. This book provides a detailed biography with a focus on the influential historical writings he composed to defend Chan claims of a "mind-to-mind transmission" tracing back to the historical Buddha. It places his defense of lineage in the context not only of attacks by the rival Tiantai school but also of the larger backdrop of the development of lineage and patriarchs as sources of authority in Chinese Buddhism.

Our Great Qing

Author: 
Johan Elverskog

Although it is generally believed that the Manchus controlled the Mongols through their patronage of Tibetan Buddhism, scant attention has been paid to the Mongol view of the Qing imperial project. In contrast to other accounts of Manchu rule, Our Great Qing focuses not only on what images the metropole wished to project into Mongolia, but also on what images the Mongols acknowledged themselves. Rather than accepting the Manchu’s use of Buddhism, Johan Elverskog begins by questioning the static, unhistorical, and hegemonic view of political life implicit in the Buddhist explanation.

An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy

Author: 
Karyn L. Lai

It is noteworthy that the two most recent textbooks that bear this title, the current one by Karyn Lai, and one by JeeLoo Liu (2006, Blackwell; also reviewed on NDPR), limit themselves to introducing the reader to early Chinese philosophy (Warring States period through the Han -- roughly 5th century BCE through 3rd century CE) and the early schools of Chinese Buddhism (from ca. 1st through 6th centuries CE).

An Introduction to Hua-yen Buddhism

Author: 
Thomas Cleary
Entry Into the Inconceivable is an introduction to the philosophy of the Hua-yen school of Buddhism, one of the cornerstones of East Asian Buddhist thought. Cleary presents a survey of the unique Buddhist scripture on which the Hua-yen teaching is based and a brief history of its introduction into China. He also presents a succinct analysis of the essential metaphysics of Hua-yen Buddhism as it developed during China's golden age and full translations of four basic texts by seminal thinkers of the school.

Buddhism Across Boundaries

Author: 
McRae, John R. and Nattier, Jan, eds.
This volume is the product of a conference held in January 1993 at Hsi Lai Temple in Hacienda Heights, California, under the sponsorship of the Fo Guang Shan Foundation for Buddhist Culture Education and Hsi Lai University.

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face

Author: 
Christine Mollier Christine Mollier
Christine Mollier reveals in this volume previously unexplored dimensions of the interaction between Buddhism and Taoism in medieval China. While scholars of Chinese religions have long recognized the mutual influences linking the two traditions, Mollier here brings to light their intense contest for hegemony in the domains of scripture and ritual.

Buddhism in China: A Historical Survey

Author: 
Kenneth Ch’en
This book is written primarily for those people who already have a general acquaintance with the history and religions of the Far East, with some particular interest in Chinese history and civilization, and those who desire to know more about the development of Buddhism in China. It also serves as a useful source of collateral readings for courses dealing with the history and culture of China and East Asia.

Pages