Sociology

  1. Buddhism Is Not What You Think

    Bestselling author and renowned Zen teacher Steve Hagen penetrates the most essential and enduring questions at the heart of the Buddha's teachings: How can we see the world in each moment, rather than merely as what we think, hope, or fear it is? How can we base our actions on reality, rather than on the longing and loathing of our hearts and minds? How can we live lives that are wise, compassionate, and in tune with reality? And how can we separate the wisdom of Buddhism from the cultural trappings and misconceptions that have come to be associated with it?

  2. Aspects of Early Sociological Buddhist Thought

    In the second part, Buddhism and Buddhist teachings are looked at from the perspective of medicine. What do Buddhist teachings say on illness and health? Health for example, is referred to as the greatest gain in life. There is much that Buddhist anthropology and sociology could gain from Buddhist thought. The social aspects of the community of monks are discussed from a sociological point of view as its theme. …..

  3. Buddhist women and social justice

    This book on engaged Buddhism focuses on women working for social justice in a wide range of Buddhist tradition and societies. Contributors document attempts to actualize Buddhism's liberating ideas of personal growth and social transformation. Dealing with issues such as human rights, gender-based violence, prostitution, and the role of Buddhist nuns, the work illuminates the possibilities for positive change that are available to those with limited power and resources. Integrating social realities and theoretical perspectives, the work utilizes feminist interpretations of Buddhist values and looks at culturally appropriate means of instigating change.

  4. Buddhism, Power and Political Order

    Weber's claim that Buddhism is an otherworldly religion is only partially true. Early sources indicate that the Buddha was sometimes diverted from supramundane interests to dwell on a variety of politically-related matters. The significance of Asoka Maurya as a paradigm for later traditions of Buddhist kingship is also well-attested. However, there has been little scholarly effort to integrate findings on the extent to which Buddhism interacted with the political order in the classical and modern states of Theravada Asia into a wider, comparative study.

  5. New Buddhist Movement in Thailand

    Vastly different in belief and practice, two new Buddhist religious movements in Thailand, namely the Wat Phra Dhammakaya and Santi Asoke emerged in Thailand in the 1970s at a time of political uncertainty, social change and increasing dissatisfaction with the Thai Sangha and its leadership.

  6. Woman under primitive Buddhism

    From the Jacket: "The book is an attempt to present the position of Buddhist laywomen and almswomen in historical perspective. For the study of the laywomen the author has exploited the material found in the Canonical literature, and the Commentaries on them".

  7. Aspect of Early Buddhist Social Thought

    Sociology is a discipline through which Buddhism could be gainfully looked at. Ven. Dr. Gnanarama, with his erudite knowledge of Buddhism and formal training in Philosophy endeavours to look at early Buddhist Sociological Thought. In the first chapter he starts with an apt definition of early Buddhism in the perspective of various philosophies. In chapter two, Buddhism and Buddhist teachings are looked at from the perspective of medicine.

  8. Buddhist Sciology

    The present study based on Buddhist thought consists of a series of essays on different topics that interest a sociologist or an anthropologist of the present day. The material is primarily taken from early Buddhist texts. The Pali texts are accepted as the earliest available Buddhist sources, and as such, those sources were given the foremost attention. Later Pali as well as Sanskrit sources are used only to expand, elaborate or elucidate what is already found in the “oroginal teachings” or early Buddhist thought.

  9. Buddhism, Power and Political Order

    Weber's claim that Buddhism is an otherworldly religion is only partially true. Early sources indicate that the Buddha was sometimes diverted from supramundane interests to dwell on a variety of politically-related matters. The significance of Asoka Maurya as a paradigm for later traditions of Buddhist kingship is also well-attested. However, there has been little scholarly effort to integrate findings on the extent to which Buddhism interacted with the political order in the classical and modern states of Theravada Asia into a wider, comparative study.

  10. Virtuous Bodies

    Virtuous Bodies breaks new ground in the field of Buddhist ethics by investigating the diverse roles bodies play in ethical development. Traditionally, Buddhists assumed a close connection between body and morality. Thus Buddhist literature contains descriptions of living beings that stink with sin, are disfigured by vices, or are perfumed and adorned with virtues.

  11. You Were Never Born

    John's fourth book, You Were Never Born, addresses the perennial and compelling question of our true identity. With his usual clarity and focus he answers questions from seekers in over seventy concise chapters of dialogues and in a departure from the format of his previous published collections, John has written an introductory set of prose pieces as well as a summary of 'pointers' toward the end of the text. Also included as an addendum is an extended one-to-one interview with John. A clear and beautiful guide to any aspirant of self-knowledge.

  12. Can Killing a Living Being Ever Be an Act of Compassion?

    In the Theravdin exegetical tradition, the notion that a intentionally killing a living being is wrong involves a claim that when certain mental states (such as compassion) are present in the mind, it is simply impossible that one could act in certain ways (such as to intentionally kill). Contrary to what Keown has claimed, the only criterion for judging whether an act is “moral” (kusala) or “immoral” (akusala) in Indian systematic Buddhist thought is the quality of the intention that motivates it.

  13. The Social Dimensions of Early Buddhism

    This book examines the relationship of Buddhism to its locus, the expanding agrartan economy of the Ganga valley during the periocl 600-300 Be. It outlines the cofttours of the major social and economic groups that were the dramatic personae in this dynamic process, especially the Gahapati, whose entrepreneurial role in the economy has not received the attention it deserves.